“Birdcage Walk” by Helen Dunmore

“Birdcage Walk” by Helen Dunmore

Lizzie and Diner have recently married. Lizzie is learning her new role as Diner’s wife, while Diner is busy trying to make his real estate development business take off. It’s the 1790’s and there is revolution in France. When Lizzie’s mother becomes pregnant, her loyalties are torn and trouble begins to brew in Lizzie’s mind. Will world events upset Diner’s carefully laid plans? Will Lizzie be able to come to terms with the specter of Diner’s first wife, who died before they met?

This is a complex and delicious story. I really loved the characters that are created here. Lizzie is a delightful young lady who is doing her best to adjust to a husband who is perhaps more demanding than she anticipated. Diner is a bit strange and sometimes I liked him but other times not so much. The mystery of the first wife adds a lot of interest and drama to the story. Basically, I loved this story and highly recommend it.

Alinefromabook’s rating: 5-star-rating  5 stars!!

Happy Reading!

On Amazon   |   On Goodreads

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Weekly Round-Up 9/17/2017

This week’s round-up is taking place in the sick ward because I have a raging sinus infection.😷🤧 I am on antibiotics though, so there is a chance I will live another day. 😊 In other news, the cold weather is starting to creep into the forecast her in North Dakota so it’s time to unpack the cold weather clothes. So let’s look at how I’ve been doing with my reading…

TBR – I finished two books this week and by some miracle didn’t add any, so the TBR is now at 268.

NetGalley – I didn’t finish any NetGalley books this week so score is still at 84%.

Goodreads Challenge – I am currently 1 book behind. 😞

Coming Up – Tomorrow I will be posting my review of “Birdcage Walk” by Helen Dunmore. Birdcage Walk I am currently reading “The Trouble With Harriet” by Dorothy Cannell, The Trouble With Harriet and “Children in the Second World War” by Amanda Herbert-Davies. Children in the Second World War So that’s it for this round-up. I hope you all are avoiding the nasty little viruses that are floating around. See you next week!

Happy Reading!

P.S. Did you notice I discovered how to add emojis? Just goes to show that you can teach an old dog new tricks.

“Rusted Halo” by Jade Alyse

“Rusted Halo” by Jade Alyse

I found this short story to be very intriguing. Sully is a young man who is mute and he lives with his father, the gardener, on an estate. The owner of the estate has two daughters, Selah and Isobel. One is beautiful and the obviously favored child, while the other is just ordinary. Sully is devoted to, and fancies himself in love with, Isobel and she is about to get married. What happens next you will have to read to find out.

I found the relationships in this story especially compelling. In a short space, the author has created a great deal of complexity among the main characters. I was also surprised by the ending which I think the author kept expertly hidden until the final page. If you’re in the mood for something short, I highly recommend this story. Also, this one is available for free right now on Kindle – see the link below.

Alinefromabook’s rating:  4-star-rating  4 stars!!

Happy Reading!

On Amazon   |   On Goodreads

“Lunatics, Imbeciles and Idiots” by Kathryn Burtinshaw & Dr. John Burt

“Lunatics, Imbeciles and Idiots” by Kathryn Burtinshaw & Dr. John Burt

A History of Insanity in Nineteenth Century Britain & Ireland

This book is for anyone interested in social history. The authors take the reader through the history of the treatment of those with mental illness during the Nineteenth century. The book opens with information about how to trace ancestors who may have been in an asylum. Chapters 2 – 9 talk about the development of asylums and the legal treatment of patients. Each chapter focuses on a different region of Britain and Ireland. Chapters 10 – 20 go on to give information about staff and how they were chosen, the different legal classifications of patients, different types of mental illness, and closes with a rundown of diagnoses and treatments. Throughout the book are scattered case histories of actual patients which illustrate the conditions at the time.

I found this book really interesting. Mental health is something I’ve always had an interest in and it amazes me at times to see how far we have come in western civilization in handling the mentally ill. The book is written in a format that is easy to read and follow. I found a lot of great information and history in this book and would recommend it for anyone interested in history or mental illness.

Alinefromabook’s rating: 4-star-rating  4 stars!!

Happy Reading!

On Amazon US   |   On Amazon UK   |   On Goodreads

Thank you to Pen & Sword Publishing for providing a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

Weekly Round-Up 9/10/2017

Welcome back everyone! It’s time for another round-up. Not much happening this week, just work and reading. My son has a cold this weekend so I’m doing all I can to avoid him in the hopes that I won’t catch it. Let’s see how the numbers look today.

TBR – I finished 1 book and 1 short story, so the current TBR is 270. I didn’t add any books this week but, full disclosure, I did request 3 from a list sent to me by Pen & Sword Publishing. Since they haven’t actually arrived yet, they are not on the list.

NetGalley – The book I finished this week was a NetGalley title and that bumped my score up to 84%.

Goodreads challenge – As of today, I am on track.

Coming Up – I will shortly have up my review of the short story Rusted Halo by Jade Alyse. Rusted Halo

In the next couple of days I will post my review of Lunatics, Imbeciles and Idiots by Kathryn Burtinshaw & Dr. John Burt. Lunatics Imbeciles and Idiots

I am currently reading Birdcage Walk by Helen Dunmore. Birdcage Walk

That’s it for now. Hope you all have a good week.

Happy Reading!

 

 

“Blackout” by Marc Elsberg

“Blackout” by Marc Elsberg

What happens when the lights go out and … they don’t come back on? In “Blackout”, Marc Elsberg explores just that question. Electrical grids have failed all across Europe, no one knows why. As the blackouts consume more and more of Europe, power plants and governments are all scrambling to find a solution. In Italy, Piero Manzano finds an anomaly on a power meter but will anyone believe him, will he be able to find the saboteur, will he come out of this alive?

This book is packed with thrills, largely because it all seems incredibly plausible. I was completely captivated with the scenario laid out in this book. The story never lets up and the characters are great. The author even manages to slip a little bit of romance in between the riots and shortages. This is the author’s debut novel and it was just released in the U.S. this summer. If catastrophe stories are something you like, then you will definitely enjoy this book. I don’t want to give anything away but I do highly recommend this book and hope the author’s subsequent work will be made available soon.

Alinefromabook’s rating:  5-star-rating 5 stars!!

Happy Reading!

On Amazon   |   On Goodreads

Weekly Round-Up 9/3/2017

Here we are again, another Sunday, another Round-Up. A pretty ordinary week, we’re back in the groove of school and already looking forward to graduation in May. So let’s get on with the numbers.

TBR – I added 1 book and finished reading 2. Today’s total is 272.

NetGalley – Both books that I finished were from NetGalley and my score has climbed to 83%.

Goodreads challenge – I am currently on track, though I’d prefer to be ahead by 1 or 2.

Coming up – Right now I’m reading “Blackout” by Marc Elsberg. Blackout

I’ve got the short story “Rusted Halo” Rusted Halo by Jade Alyse on the schedule for this week followSed by “Birdcage Walk” Birdcage Walk by Helen Dunmore.

So that’s it for this week. If you live in the U.S., I hope you have a great Labor Day tomorrow. I’ll check in again next Sunday.

Happy Reading!

 

“The Party” by Robyn Harding

“The Party” by Robyn Harding

Can a birthday party destroy lives? One wealthy San Francisco family is about to find out. Hannah is turning 16 and her parents agree to a sleepover party with four guests. The girls arrive. The pizza and cake is delivered. Jeff and Kim go to bed assuming that the girls will watch movies and talk all night, safely ensconced in the family basement. What happens in the wee hours of the morning will completely alter the lives of this model family and their guests forever.

This is a great story about relationships and family dynamics and how one small choice can change a person forever. The characters are wonderful and perfectly suited to their roles. I couldn’t help but love Hannah, a girl on the cusp of adulthood who just wants to explore what it means to be alive. I totally sympathized with Mom Kim and her frustration with her teenage daughter, while at the same time I completely got why Hannah felt so restricted by her mom’s presence. Jeff was a little harder to like as he seemed at times to be trying to ignore that he had a family, but at same time wants to be the cool Dad in the eyes of his teenage daughter. I also really enjoyed the interplay between the main characters and the side players. I think the author really hit the nail on the head with how she portrayed the ever changing landscape of the character’s social circles. There is a message here about how variable “friendships” can be. This book also has a lot to say about bullying, both amongst the kids and the adults that surround them. I found this story to be brilliantly conceived and executed and I highly recommend it.

Alinefromabook’s rating:  5-star-rating  5 stars!!

Happy Reading!

On Amazon   |   On Goodreads